30 Bananas a Day!

I am now 95% sure that my almost 5 year old son has Aspergers. I know a vegan diet can help (looking back to when we went vegan 2.5 years ago, I can see the proof). Do any of you have experience with aspergers and raw?

 

If he is eating grapes and gets a tiny seed or hard part like part of the stem didn't come out, etc. He will be done with grapes for days to weeks. Will not touch even just one more.

He no longer has smoothies, because of the strawberry and raspberry seeds.

If a banana has a slightly brown spot anywhere, forget about it. Etc.

 

Experience and tips appreciated! I'm really wondering how much difference it could make from vegan to raw.

Views: 972

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Aspergers is on the autism scale but difficult to "identify" as most people that have do not seem any different. They are very sensitive to a lot of things like noise, lights, textures, etc. Sometimes it is difficult for somebody with aspergers to process certain situations, especially socially. I suggest looking at the movie Temple Grandin.

My son loves flashlights, but hates those disco lights that they sometimes have at weddings because they move around too much and flash.
He loves pears, but they have to be peeled and can not have a chance to discolor.
He used to love smoothies, but if he gets even a smidge of a seed he won't eat them.
Food and clothing options have to be simple. If I make something like a rice stir-fry, his can have for example rice and celery, but no more ingredients or it overwhelms him.


Routine is important. It can be very upsetting for somebody with aspergers to stray from their routine (have you ever seen Big Bang Theory? Sheldon Cooper shows signs of Aspergers). Also, they have great memories and are often very intelligent, pay attention to detail and like patterns. Some clothing may be irritating more than others because their skin is sensitive. A lot of people with aspergers don't like to be touched. We're lucky, my son had it bad before we went vegan. We're not raw (yet).

Before we went vegan, my son would go into uncontrollable fits over something as simple as how his sandwich had been cut (it had to be the same each time) to the point it was like he couldn't even see me or hear me, he was just gone.. he would become very violent and scream and shake, and I often had to hold him tight to keep him from hurting himself.
He would line magnets up in order of color, in a perfectly straight line (could have gotten a ruler to compare, it was amazing) by the age of two.
He is almost 5 and still remembers what he wore for halloween three years ago, the color of his room, the names of all the reptiles we had at the time, what he got for Christmas and from who, etc.. and for every year. He explains it all in detail.
He wouldn't play with anybody. He liked to have people around, but preferred to play on his own. He wouldn't make eye contact with anybody, and resisted me all the time (I'm a cuddler, and didn't understand so I felt he didn't want to be around me - as his mother this was very confusing and difficult).

Now he is social (some of the time, good days and bad), makes eye contact, his fits are controllable, he gets easily overwhelmed still, he loves routine but can adjust to straying from it if properly prepared, hates noise but understands that he can control the volume by covering his ears and leaving the room (he loves parades but has to watch it with his ears covered).

When doing something such as watching TV he will rock, or swing his feet, rub/fidget with his fingers, tap his hands on his knees, any repititive movement.

I hope that helps..

it does yes thank you :o))

I would just try different things one at a time and see what happens. I think kids in general should be given a spread of fresh fruits and vegetables and allowed to graze over a 1-3 hour period in the evenings instead of being forced to sit at a table and gobble food down. I have seen power struggles like this take over a family dynamic and cause long term eating disorder problems.

 

Your child has some added concerns but I wouldnt look at him as a particular "label" either. Just allow things to unfold naturally and stay creative. Try mono-meals and think about it as being normal and fun- not as a burden or weird. You could try grating apples and serving a big bowl of just that. Then if he wants to put raisins in there or celery at some point-make those choices available.

 

The focus shouldnt be on the food- it should be on what has been going on lately, what did he learn or find interesting, or how much you guys love each other.

You could even play a game where you put different food in paper bags and he just chooses one without knowing what it is- he could even close his eyes while he eats for fun.

 

I recently found out that neurotransmitters are made in the intestines. I was seriously blown away by this idea. This is why certain foods can be so important like fermented foods, blue green algae, high mineral foods like seaweed, etc. used at periodic times for what an individual is experiencing. Strawberries are the highest pesticide residue foods and bananas can be an issue for people with sensitivities to latex. So it's best not to push something on someone for whatever reason they give.

 

I hope the best for you and your son. I know you can find solutions together and learn a lot in the process. <3

My 9 year old daughter has Asperger's as well.  I can relate to a lot of what people here have said about the meltdowns that they have.  She also has sensory issues with clothes - VERY picky about the feel of things on her skin.  When at home, she likes to strip down to panties and run around with a soft blanket wrapped around her (it's just her and I so I let her when we have no company).  I laughed when I read about the comment about cutting their sandwiches, lol.  She's not so bad now that she's older, but when she was younger if I cut her sandwich wrong she would fall apart and refuse to eat it.  People would say "just refuse to give her anything else and she will stop doing it and eat."  These people have no idea what us parents face.  My daughter can easily launch into meltdowns that can last for hours.  Kids with Asperger's can be VERY difficult, but because they appear outwardly "normal" people don't understand and just assume that they are spoiled/manipulative, etc

One tip I can offer is to get him involved in the food prep.  I have found this to help with my daughter.  I've always encouraged my daughter to eat new things but I have never forced her.  If there was something she didn't want to eat I would have her help me cook it and a lot of times she would be proud that she had helped cook it and so she would be more open to giving it a try.    Never force him to eat/drink anything he doesn't want to or he may continue to refuse just because you tried to make him.  These kids can have very restrictive thought processes and if you interfere too much they can clamp down so hard it is next to impossible to convince them to try something different.

My daughter is not raw yet so I cannot comment on that.  Asperger's is neurologically based so raw/vegan may help, but in my opinion it will never "cure" it.  People with autism have differences in their brain anatomy from "neurotypical" people - there is research that proves that with MRI scans.  It's not curable and that's good, because to me, even with all the difficulties Asperger's presents it is also a very special thing.  Their minds work in ways that ours don't.  My daughter is a straight A student in a class for gifted and talented children.  She is incredibly intelligent.  We don't need to fix/cure them - just help them to cope in this world.

I agree with you.

I don't think being raw vegan will cure Asperger's nor is that really what most people with Asperger's would want. I cannot imagine not having Asperger's, it's part of who I am. But the world can be a very challenging place with all the sensory stimulation and social interactions to be navigated and I'm glad that being raw vegan is helping me cope with some of it a little better.

Thank you, just having another parent on the board that understands is so helpful. I'm not looking for a "cure" he is very special and I love how he sees the world, and would never want to change any of that. I just want to make things a little easier for him, maybe have the sensory issues be a little less challenging. :)

UPDATE: We've come a long way in just one day. It seems that our son will eat an unlimited amount of blueberries in any way shape or form. It started with him tasting his sisters blueberry banana smoothie, and wanting one of his own. He drank all of it (thank you vitamix!). Then we went to the health food store, where they have the option of making your own peanut butter (he loved it, though he had to cover his ears the whole time). I know peanut butter isn't the best, but its the only way he will eat bananas right now (and no other nut butter compares for him). Now he's sitting here eating a bunch of frozen blueberries - I'm a little afraid they will put him off, but even though he said they are "cold and kinda yucky" (I could see a texture issue brewing) he's still eating them. Lets hope this sticks for a little while!

that's sweet :o)

I have been trying to gain my friend's attention to go raw, and I still have a way to go... so I empathise with you in how it's not so easy to get them to use the lifestyle...

nick

my friend has asperger's and he's on an antipsychotic for it - is that usual?

I know this post is old... but have you checked out www.cdautism.org, or the facebook Group CDHEalth? It may seem extreme, weird and absolutely unnatural. But the results speak for themselves. The thought is that parasites/microbes/biofilm are the cause of most (all?) of the problems.

 

I believe that eating high carb raw vegan may change the 'inner terrain' so that these pathogens will be eliminated. BUT I also believe that when the body is already 'taken over' by them, it is near impossible to simply start eating this way. I don't think it's ONLY a matter of will power, or eating enough calories (carbs). At the stage your son is I would not think you can get enough raw vegan food into him to succeed. 

The CD protocol (see also the book by Kerri Rivera) is used with all sorts of chronic and auto-immune problem. People claim to have recovered from autism (as diagnosed/'measured' by the ATEC scores), Lyme, fibromyalgia, ADD, aspergers +++ worth looking at before making up your mind :)

 

Good Luck!

Kat

RSS

30BaD search

Loading

Freelee & Durianrider Blogs

         Durianriders Blog

            Freelee's Blog

© 2014   Created by TheBananaGirl.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service